MODR 1770 O - Techniques of Persuasion

Important Updates and Announcements


PRESENTATIONS BEGIN TUESDAY MARCH 19th 


Be on-time!!!!!!! (if you're late, you won't be able to finish the work assigned.)


Presenters should bring 1 copy of completed essay and rough work for submission.


Presenters should also bring 3 copies of the paper only for distribution to student reviewers.


If you present early on any presentation date, you must attend all 3 of the last classes starting at 11:30 am.


If you present late on any presentation date, you must attend all 3 of the last classes starting at 1:00 pm.


Homework for non-presenters :  Read Article One. You need to be familiar with the article before you can evaluate the presenter's critique.


Also, continue working on your paper-presentations.


Penalty for presenter 'No-Show':  25%


Penalty for reviewer 'No-Show': 2.5% per missed class (2 missed classes = half grade deduction)



Presenters for March 26 - Article Two


Early 11:30-1:00


Sumayyah A.

Jilian A.

Saad B.

Malena C.

Natalie C.

Navkiran D.

Arishveer G.

Mariama H.


Late 1:00-2:30


Luisa L.

Nicholas L.

Daniel M.

Victory N.

Jathusan P.

Rebecca R.

Khanh T.


_______________________________


Presenters March 19th

Early 11:30-1:00pm  /  March 19


Ann A.

Tieba Al-M.

Abigail A.

Mariano C-B.

Cassandra C.

Narendra D.

Reuf D.

Efecan H.


Late 1:00-2:30pm  /  March 19


Robert K.

Ho-Kuen L.

Michael M.

Sharon Ng.

Hope P.

Michael Raju

Bianca S.

Taja-Mae V


___________________________________


Homework for March 12 --OPTIONAL CLASS



I'll be in class to answer any general questions about your last assignment and to receive late hard copy submissions. No formal lecture as such.



Read Appendix II in the text.



Work on your assigned article using the steps and procedures discussed and modelled in class.  See ‘passage analysis worksheet’ in the menu bar above. Also refer to classroom notes.


Homework for Non-Presenters March 19th


Read Article One (click on "More" link in the menu bar to find articles) 


You won't be able to properly evaluate the student's paper if you haven't read the assigned article.


Keep working on your paper-presentation


CLASS ON MARCH 19  


Be on-time!!!!!!! (if you're late, you won't be able to finish the work assigned.)


Presenters should bring 1 copy of completed essay and rough work for submission.


Presenters should also bring 3 copies of the paper only for distribution to student reviewers.


If you present early on any presentation date, you must attend all 3 of the last classes starting at 11:30. Early.


If you present late on any presentation date, you must attend all 3 of the last classes starting at 1:00pm. Late.



Presenters March 19th

Early 11:30-1:00pm  /  March 19


Ann A.

Tieba Al-M.

Abigail A.

Mariano C-B.

Cassandra C.

Narendra D.

Reuf D.

Efecan H.


Late 1:00-2:30pm  /  March 19


Robert K.

Ho-Kuen L.

Michael M.

Sharon Ng.

Hope P.

Michael Raju

Bianca S.

Taja-Mae V.


________________________________



FIRST PAPERS DUE ON FEB. 26TH !!!!!!!  (scroll down for instructions)


LATE PAPERS - Copy and Paste entire assignment into an email using ONLY your YorkU email account. 


I will write back acknowledging receipt of your assignment with indication of penalty - 10% per day. 


You can submit hard copy the following week in class.



Homework for March 5


Find your name below. Above your name will be the date of your second paper-presentation, as well as the article you’ve been assigned to critically evaluate. Articles 1,2, and 3 can be found by clicking on the menu bar above. Click the link: More and then Articles for Analysis. The passage analysis worksheet can be found there too.



Read Appendix II in the text.


Work on your assigned article using the steps and procedures discussed and modeled in class.  See ‘passage analysis worksheet’ in the menu bar above. Also refer to classroom notes.


ARTICLE ONE PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS DUE ON MARCH 19TH. (Individual student due dates vary according to article assigned.)


Early 11:30-1:00pm  /  March 19


Ann A.


Tieba Al-M.


Abigail A.


Mariano C-B.


Cassandra C.


Narendra D.


Reuf D.


Efecan H.



Late 1:00-2:30pm  /  March 19



Robert K.


Ho-Kuen L.


Michael M.


Sharon Ng.


Hope P.


Michael Raju


Bianca S.


Taja-Mae V.


Presenters for March 26 - Article Two


Early 11:30-1:00


Sumayyah A.


Jilian A.


Saad B.


Malena C.


Natalie C.


Navkiran D.


Arishveer G.


Mariama H.



Late 1:00-2:30


Luisa L.


Nicholas L.


Daniel M.


Victory N.


Jathusan P.


Rebecca R.


Khanh T.



Presenters for April 2 - Article Three


Early 11:30-1:00pm


Miryam W.


Jushin S


Ameen Al-G.


Samira A.


Sheryl B. 


Young  C.



Justin De.


Rohit Dh.



Late 1:00-2:30


Matthew G.

Saif J.


Sean L.


Gavon M.


Michael Nel.


Matias P-A.



Chase Q.




 

NOTE: Please find below the notes you would have taken on Feb. 12th in class had there been no snow storm. Read carefully and fully!! 



Instructions and Explanations for Paper One



1. Every paper must include a ‘paper outline’. (An example is provided below. Refer to text as well.)



Scroll down further below for help on how to write an Introduction to your paper. (This content on Introduction and Outline are covered in Appendix I in the text.)

Also see below for instructions on the Cover page for your assignment.



Lastly, see below for how the assignment should be assembled and submitted.


__________________________________________________________



1. Producing an Outline


The number of dialectical exchanges that should be included in any paper depends on length and level of detail required by your professor. Typically, three or four of them make for about a 1300-1400 word paper. Before developing those arguments, it is useful to produce an outline. This tool helps you to cast and visualize your complete argument.

An outline should be about one page in length. See what follows for an example of an outline. Bullet points are fine. Don’t write paragraphs and explanations here. Save that for the paper itself.

________________________________________________



Paper Outline


Topic: Recreational drug use in America

Specific Issue/Controversy or Question: How should we deal with marijuana?

Thesis Statement: Marijuana should be legalized.


Preview of Supporting Arguments:

1. Economic

2. Constitutional

3. Health and Leisure



1st Supporting Argument

Claim: Legalizing marijuana is good for the economy

Objection: The cost of government regulation will outweigh the economic benefits

Counter- Criticism: Objection is pure speculation; the evidence provided is flawed.


2nd Supporting Argument

Claim: Citizens have the right to smoke marijuana.

Objection: Rights are limited by harm done.

Counter- Criticism: Inconsistent to ban marijuana, but legalize harmful alcohol and tobacco


3rd Supporting Argument

Claim: Marijuana is good for leisure and entertainment.

Objection: This leisure makes for addictive gateway to harder drug use.

Counter- Criticism: The overwhelming majority who use marijuana do not become addicted to harder drugs.


End of Outline

______________________________________________


The specific content above is not what’s important for our purposes here; the organization and visual display are. You and your professor should be able to “see” the structure and basic contents of the argument when it is cast in this fashion.


Once an outline such as the one above is produced, we have the bare bones of a thesis defense paper. What’s left now is to put flesh on the bones. This entails actually writing the paper. You already have in your notes how to write “one dialectical exchange”.

The first part of the outline - including the topic, issue/question, thesis statement, and preview of supporting arguments - constitute the Introduction of your paper. When translated into sentence and paragraph form, this could take up anywhere from one half to a full page of text. (More about the Introduction to follow.)



Each one of the supporting dialectical arguments, which present supporting claims and then flesh out possible objections and counter- criticisms, should require about a page each themselves, often more. Thus, we produce a written essay that is about three and a half to four pages in length – somewhere around 1300-1400 words, depending on spacing, margins and font size.


What about a conclusion? With a paper this short, conclusions are not generally required. However, if you can somehow offer added value to the debate on the issue and put into clearer, sharper focus what you’ve tried to accomplish in the argument, then okay, add one. Be careful, though, often conclusions are used by many students as mere ‘word fillers’ to reach the minimal length stipulated by the professor of the course assigning the paper. Professors notice. They’re generally not impressed.


When papers are longer than three or four pages, a conclusion may be useful as a summary statement of the major points made. Use your discretion when deciding what to do with respect to including or not including one. If you don’t write a conclusion, it’s easy to end your paper in this fashion: “My final argument for the stated thesis rests on the notion that…..” By using a flag word such as ‘final,’ the reader is not left hanging, as closure to the discussion is anticipated.


Writing an Introduction (before you start your argument)



Elements of your Introduction


Topic:  In very general terms, what is your paper about? (economic ideology, legal reform, mental health, etc.) 

Issue: What’s the controversy, conflict, question, issue, or problem? (The topic and issue frame the problem you address in your paper. It provides the parameters for the discussion, stating explicitly what’s being addressed. Both Topic and Issue contextualize, or provide a context for, the discussion.) 

Thesis Statement: This is a SINGLE claim stating your position on the issue / your answer to the question / your solution to the problem. The thesis statement often requires some clarification and explanation. What precisely will you be arguing?

Preview: Without getting into details, the Introduction should also provide a very brief preview of what’s to come (e.g., “In defense of my thesis, I will provide three arguments resting on economic, constitutional, and health considerations. I will also entertain possible objections to my claims and respond to those in turn”.) Notice, no details of any of the three arguments are provided in the Introduction.


3. Cover Page Instructions

Your assignment should have a cover page with the following information provided

your name

student number

course code and section: MODR 1770 (O)

my name....get the spelling right! I’m sensitive. :)

date submitted

word count, NOT including Outline or Rough work

title, if you so choose.

numbering of pages is optional, but helpful at my end


4. Assembly of Assignment


Put your assignment together in this fashion:

First, Cover page

Second, Outline

Third, Essay

Fourth, Rough Work

Fifth, stapled together top left.


Oh, I forgot,....use 11 or 12 pt font, double spaced, one inch margins in the essay. Leave space for comment on your cover page.


FINAL NOTE: Do the best you can with the instructions and details provided in this update. 


I’m afraid I won’t be on campus until Feb. 25th and I can’t possibly answer individual questions about the assignment requiring me to “teach by email”.  

Feel confident that you have all the information here that you will need to complete the assignment. 

In marking, I will take into account the fact that I was unable to actually deliver a lecture on the notes provided above. .....the detailed notes are probably better than the lecture, just sayin’. Appendix I is very useful as well.



Marking Scheme for Paper

Introduction /2 marks

Dialectical Structure & Organization /2

Quality of Arguments  /4

Style and Assembly of Assignment

(Spelling, Grammar, Wording, etc.) /2

Rough Work  /10

______


/20  

Good Luck! See you on the 26th.

__________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

image30